Slide Slide Slide Slide Slide Ash dieback is spreading across the country
and is killing thousands of trees in Eastbourne.

It is estimated that around 95% of ash trees in the UK will die.

Temporary road closure – Upper Dukes Drive

Our contractors are working in the Upper Dukes Drive area. The temporary road closure will allow for the safe removal of dead and dying trees. This vital work will be completed as quickly as possible, but we apologise for the inevitable inconvenience it will cause. A barrier system is in place to allow essential vehicle access. During the road closure parking in Upper Dukes Drive will not be permitted.

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Phase two of the project starts in November 2020.  Our contractors will be working close to Upper Dukes Drive in Meads and behind Longland Road and around Pashley Down Infant School in Old Town.

Ash dieback is the most devastating tree disease since dutch elm disease killed 60 million elm trees in the UK during two epidemics in the 1920s and 1970s.

What is ash dieback?

Ash dieback (Hymenoscyphus fraxineus) is the most devastating tree disease since dutch elm disease killed 60 million elm trees in the UK during two epidemics in the 1920s and 1970s.

The disease is changing the profile of the landscape across the UK and will undoubtedly change how we view a span of the downland in Eastbourne.

The disease is spread by an airborne fungus. It attacks the vascular system of trees, killing young trees very quickly and more mature specimens over a longer period.

This video shows very clearly how so much of the tree canopy in woodland between Butts Brow in Willingdon to Meads has turned a pallid grey colour, a sure sign of ash dieback.

The impact of ash dieback

The airborne fungus has reached and spread rapidly throughout Eastbourne, leaving thousands of trees dead or dying. Currently there is no preventative treatment available. A diseased tree becomes weakened, with branches or the tree itself at risk of falling onto footpaths, roads and property.

The council is working with the Forestry Commission to remove the trees in Eastbourne that are infected with ash dieback.

Tackling the disease

Councils up and down the UK are working with the Forestry Commission to remove trees affected by ash dieback. In Eastbourne, the Forestry Commission has identified the trees that are dead or dying and must be removed.

The main area of woodland affected runs between Butts Brow in Willingdon to Meads (click to enlarge map).

Accordingly, we have developed a long-term plan in liaison with the Forestry Commission that will see felling begin in early December 2019. The whole project will take up to five years to complete.

Once cut, the diseased timber will be taken to a biomass facility. The council will receive payments from the energy generator for the timber that will broadly offset the cost of the overall project.

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